40 Photos – 21-40


Silicon City - San Francisco

 

Silicon City, San Francisco

The 50 miles (80km) between San Francisco and San Jose California is known as Silicon Valley, the world’s center of high technology, but San Francisco is becoming ‘Silicon City.’ This is the Bay Bridge. The Golden Gate Bridge is to the right of this view. By 2018, many 800-1200 foot tall buildings will be added to the skyline.

I wanted a view that captures the feel of this place. However, to get here requires you to park at the top of the hill and hike down to it. To get this open view, you need to get right to the edge of the cliff, so I don’t officially recommend you try this. There are probably places in your hometown that are a bit risky. Give them a try but be careful!

The lesson here is that sometimes it takes a lot of effort to execute your vision. Sometimes it doesn’t work out. Enjoy the journey because that’s half the fun.

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 17-40L @24

1-minute exposure @F18 (pushing it but it looks fine at full-res)

1-LEE soft ND grad 0.9 (100x150mm)

(2 grads with bright lights creates reflected lights)

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

No polarizer

ISO 50

Small Slik tripod with Manfrotto pistol grip ball head

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Sturdy hiking boots to keep from falling off the hill

(This is to the left of most shots taken here to get the full 2×3 ratio frame!)

I was literally hanging off the cliff to get this perspective.

 

Angel Island Sky #4

Angel Island Sky #4, Sausalito, California

The morning fog lifted for the day. There are few clouds during the summer half of the year, but the fog can create some good atmosphere and light under the right conditions. The trick is to be ready before sunrise, so if it has promise, head out early! Study your local conditions closely so you can be ready for anything.

As usual, this light lasted for about 5 minutes or so. You don’t get a second chance with fog because one moment it’s too thick and the next minute it burns off to clear skies for the rest of the day! So you must be ready for when the light breaks through. Hopefully it breaks through before it gets too harsh and bright with the sun too high in the sky.

I was really out to shoot the Golden Gate Bridge because there was low fog, but it was not meant to be. The fog was too thick. But that was fine because I have lots of alternative compositions like this planned out, so I just follow the light to where it leads me.

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 24-105L @ 45

30-second exposure @F11

HOYA NDX-400 9.5-stop filter (Very dark) for the long exposure.

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.75

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

No polarizer

ISO 50

Small Slik tripod with Manfrotto Pistol-grip ball head.

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Fog at the Gate #1 - San Francisco

Fog at the Gate #1, San Francisco

The fog settled on the bridge deck just before sunrise. This may seem like a typical scenario, but the fog shifts quickly, burying the bridge or leaving it completely exposed. The fog doesn’t cooperate as often as you might think.

September and October are great months for capturing low fog at the Golden Gate. The inversion is weaker but still there and the fog is often not as deep. So I got up at 2 hours before sunrise, checked the weather and headed out. You need to get here before sunrise to capture the best light. As I left the hillside after sunrise, a bunch of other photographers were setting up their tripods but the light was already harsh and bright because the high clouds were thin. Too bad I was alone to see this!

The lesson here is that sometimes you need to do what other’s don’t to capture something inspirational and out of the ordinary. I see more and more photographers doing this now! And photos are getting better.

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 17-40L @19

2-minute exposure @F8

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm – 4x6in) 0.9

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

No polarizer

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Small Slik Sprint mini tripod

Manfrotto 322RC2 pistol-grip ball head

 

Grandmother of the Ages #1 - Trinidad beach, Humboldt County, Ca

Grandmother of the Ages #1, Trinidad, California

This is the cover image for this book. Grandmother Rock bears witness to yet another impressive sunset at Trinidad Beach, just north of Eureka, California. First image in a series made during this evening.

It looked like the week ahead would be unusually stormy for late April in California. Usually we are dry from the end of March until November. So I headed north on Monday from my place just east of San Francisco do do a little shooting. I heard about Trinidad State Beach and what I saw on Google Earth looked impressive, so I found a place to stay nearby for the entire week. I wanted to make sure that I had several chances for good light at sunset.

It rained most of the day so I stayed in my hotel room, watching the satellite. An hour before sunset I noticed a gap in the clouds opening over the ocean behind the cold front as it approached. I put the satellite movie in a loop and tried to guess whether the gap would make it to land before sunset. I drove out to the cliff above the ocean in the driving rain and waited. It began to get dark and it looked hopeless. I peered into the darkening gray searching for the slightest sign of clearing.

Then I noticed an odd color to the gray. A dull red color. I could tell that just beyond my sight, something big was happening even though the rain was harder than ever. That’s how it is at the frontal boundary. The hardest rain means a chance of clearing. I got my gear and my umbrella an headed down to the beach and ran across to this place you see in the photo. I had planned this composition earlier.

As I got here, I glanced up and an apocalyptic scene emerged above me. I’ve never seen anything like it. My hands were shaking as I removed my shoes. I was already in shorts, assuming I’d get wet. I always do. I became nervous about capturing this moment. I made about 20 images and then put on a dark filter for the photo you’ll see next.

And to think I debated leaving the hotel room!

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 17-40L @ 21

1/4-second exposure @F11

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.6 angled from 8am-2pm

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Keen water shoes

 

Trinidad Last Light - Humboldt County, California

Trinidad Last Light, Trinidad, California

As the sunset continued on after I made the previous image, the colors became even more intense.

I usually wait to go for the long exposure once it’s too dark for my shorter ones, but I have my 10-stop very dark filter, so I had to give it a go. Why not use it while there is still good light in the sky? This exposure started about 5 minutes before sunset. The lower layer of cloud was moving one way while the higher clouds were moving another way. I had no idea it would turn out like this. I like the long streaks from a long exposure, but here, a streak would begin and then get erased by another cloud moving in to block it. The higher layer had all the colors, so the lower clouds passing by stopped the streaks of colors. I’m going to experiment with crossing cloud layers more, now that I see what they do.

It was getting a bit darker, so I bumped the ISO up to 200 because my usual ISO 50 would have meant a 10 minute exposure. I studied where the waves broke on average, so I would know where to put the tripod so that over 3 minutes, a reflection would be visible.

I knew that in order to get reflections on the sand, I’d have to get hit many times by waves, so before starting the exposure I dug the tripod into the sand about 1 foot and let a few wave cycles wash through to stabilize the tripod. The full res image is totally sharp.

 

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 17-40L @ 20

3-Minute exposure @F11

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.6

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

Hoya ndx400 (10-stop) very dark circular ND filter, very little vignetting @20mm wide!

ISO 200 (I had to bump up the ISO to keep it at 3 minutes)

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Bare feet (soft sand)

 

Fork in the Road - Walnut Creek, Contra Costa, California

Fork In The Road, Walnut Creek, California

American baseball great Yogi Berra once said (when giving directions to his house, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” So when I saw this view, I did! I didn’t touch the saturation slider. Minimal post-processing was done.

This is the view on the hill behind my house. I’m always on the lookout for a spectacular sunrise that you rarely see on vacation because you’re only there for a few days. I have pre-scouted these hills for good locations where I can get to them quickly. One evening, I noticed on the satellite photos that there was a storm front moving in from the west by sunrise, leaving the eastern sky clear for the sun to come in under the advancing clouds from the west. So I got up early, noticed that the clouds were arriving just as the sky became light. By sunrise, the open sky was reduced to a sliver on the horizon, which is the best situation.

I went to my spot, saw this amazing sight, and was done in about 10 minutes. I do have some from a few minutes earlier with a sky so red that the photos are not useable. Here the sky is better lit and so is the land. This looks like a reflected sunrise over the ocean and hills in the distance, but the light is reflecting off of the river deltas in California’s Central Valley. It’s the most productive agricultural valley on the planet because of the snow melt from the Sierra Nevada and 300 sunny days per year. This would not be one of them.

 

Canon 5D Mk II

Canon 17-40L @23

0.6-second exposure @F14

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.75

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 200

Small Slik Mini tripod

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Maelstrom #3 - Near Kilauea Point, Kauai, Hawaii

Maelstrom #3, near the Kilauea Lighthouse, Kauai, Hawaii

I had this near-death experience on a trip to Kauai not long ago! This lava-ledge is 20 feet above the sea, and I suppose the incoming wave is twice that height. This isn’t the Sprouting Horn near Poipu and it’s not Queen’s bath! It is called the Mokolea Lava Pools. It’s east of the Kilauea Lighthouse.

To get this shot:

 

1. Get up 2 hours before sunrise…. on your vacation.

2. Put on your old shoes and shorts that are destined to become stained with red mud. I used Keen water shoes.

3. Drive to the trail head (Right turn before the Kilauea Lighthouse.) There is a way to cross the stream from the next beach over, but it’s treacherous at times.

4. Make sure there are decent clouds before committing to the hike down.

5. Get out your flashlight. I have a wind-up one, so no worry about batteries.

6. Navigate the extremely slippery trail, in the dark, often on all-fours, for 1/2 mile

7. Ignore the strange noises in the dense steamy jungle, if you can!

8. IMPORTANT! Watch the surf for at least 20 minutes to determine a safe place to be.

9. Hand-hold the camera to get the settings right before heading into the water.

10. Set up the tripod and composition just before the next wave hits.

11. Make the exposure and run!

12. As you run, make sure to avoid spilling too much blood extracted by the sharp lava rock. And don’t get sucked into the hole. It’s certain death. I’m not kidding.

 

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @ 27

0.6-second exposure @F14

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.6

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Keen water shoes

 

Lava Light - Near Hana, Maui

Lava Light, Near Hana, Maui, Hawaii

Sunrise broke, as the cobblestones rolled around on the volcanic coast of East Maui, Hawaii. For a photographer, the east side of Maui is the most interesting side.

This black cobblestone beach near Hana, is right next to what is locally called the Venus Pool. This is a spectacular place with a pool right behind the beach. Most people photograph the pool, but the ankle-breaking cobblestones were too much to resist! I did get a nice one of the pool later however. The black rocks reflect virtually no light for the camera unless they are wet and shiny from erosion. So I found a nice reflective spot and waited for the light on the rock and the cobblestones. Once that happened, I waited for a nicely formed wave to break.

I saw nobody for the entire two hours I spent on this beach. This side of the island has very few people and the tourists (no buses allowed on the 50 or so one-way bridges) do not arrive until after 10am.

Canon 5D (original mk I)

Canon 17-40L @33

0.2 second exposure @F10

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.75

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 200 (I like ISO 50 but I needed a shorter exposure in this low light)

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

McClures Last Light - Point Reyes National Seashore, Marin Count

McClure’s Last Light, Point Reyes National Seashore, California

This is a difficult place to photograph because there are so many choices! To the left of the background rocks is another beach accessible through a crack in the rocks and the light is different over there.

Sometimes it is better on one side than the other, so you have to run back and forth repeatedly trying to decide what to do. I got plenty of exercise!

I settled on this composition because it felt just right. All the elements were there. I got wet as usual but that was okay. Go with the best feeling and you won’t go wrong.

Canon 5D Mk II

Canon 17-40L @21

0.4 second exposure @F11

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm 0.9 + 0.75

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 100

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Low Tide!

 

The Photographers - Marin County, California

The Photographers, Marin County, California

Two photographers stood on the top of a hill overlooking the fog over the Pacific Ocean, and the dry hillside on Mt. Tamalpais.

The sky during the summer half of the year is usually clear, so when I saw few high clouds drifting by in the weather satellite movie, I took the opportunity to go up to Mt. Tamalpais above the fog. So did a couple of other photographers on the hill to the right. They seemed so small compared to the grand scene before them, but they also became a perfect focal point for this scene. Even though they were far away, I could hear them discussing where to stand and point the camera! I could also hear the waves crashing more than 2,000 feet below in the fog. You can see the two photographers when you expand the photo big. In the full sized tiff file, you can tell what they’re wearing!

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon 17-40L @ 32

0.4-second exposure @F14

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm) 0.9 + 0.6

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Library of Ages #1 - Montana De Oro, California

Library of Ages, Montana de Oro Park, Central California

The rock layers which record the geologic history of Montana De Oro State Park just south of Big Sur can be read like books in an ancient library. This place is a 3 hour drive south of San Francisco and 3 hours north from LA. A long exposure isolated the rock by smoothing the large and violent surf. A shorter exposure would have emphasized the motion of the water and distracted from the incredible rock formations. A dark fog moved in just as the sun set to enhance the mood and allow a longer exposure time. I did make some more dramatic shorter exposures.

It’s amazing to think that at one time, these layers were put down one at a time on the bottom of the ocean or a lake or bay. Then they were slowly lifted and tilted at a 45 degree angle without breaking!

The footing on the slippery stone was treacherous. Every time I wanted to move more than 5 feet, I had to pack everything into the backpack and crawl along on my hands and knees, so as not to break the camera. Now I see why there are so few pictures taken close to the water at this place! This is 10 miles south Morro Bay.

Canon 5D (original mark 1)

30-second exposure @F16

LEE Soft 150x100cm ND grad 0.9

Lee foundation kit filter holder

Canon 17-40L @ 18

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Bird Rock - Point Lobos, Carmel, California

Bird Rock, Point Lobos, California

I’ve been planning this shot for about two years. Back then, I noticed how the layered slabs of rock, the sloping hills, and the horizon all seemed to point to Bird Rock in the distance, but the conditions were never good for the element of atmosphere. Finally a storm came through just before sunset and I was able to make the image I had hoped for.

I waited for some light to strike the rock and mountains of Big Sur to the left. Then I waited for a wave to sweep into the cove. There were big waves striking the rock in the left-center, but they were REALLY big and blocked out the rest of the scene. So I waited for a smaller more sweeping wave to make a more gentle and flowing image. This is more of a landscape than a seascape anyway.

Canon 5D Mark II

0.5-second exposure @F13 with Lee LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm 0.9 + 0.75

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

Canon 17-40L @ 21

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

Small Slik Mini tripod

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

 

 

Light at the end of the Pier - Hanalei, Kauai, Hawaii

Light at the End of the Pier, Hanalei, Kauai

The Hanalei Pier points directly towards the mountains often referred to as Bali Hai. It refers to a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II from the musical South Pacific. This area loosely resembles the island of Tioman, which is the original Bali Hai. The mountains here are higher and more sharply sculpted however.

With the sun rising behind the camera, openings in the clouds allowed the light to filter into the clouds and illuminate the mountains on the opposite side of Hanalei Bay. Within 10 minutes the rain came in and this low warm light was gone for the day, replaced later by the bright light of mid-day. I used a long exposure to show the motion in the clouds. Also, the long exposure time smoothed out the water and simplified the image. That enhanced the effect of light hitting the posts of the pier.

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @ 30

25-second exposure @F20

LEE soft ND grad (100x150mm 0.9 + 0.6

Lee foundation kit filter holder with Lee 77mm adapter ring

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

Small Slik Mini tripod

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

 

Hanalei Mist - Kauai, Hawaii

Hanalei Mist, Kauai, Hawaii

Clear skies would have been nice to walk under, but the mood would have been gone and the light would have been harsh. Hanalei Bay is a 3-mile long perfect crescent of sand surrounded by the world’s rainiest mountains. Over 500 inches of rain drench nearby Mt. Waialeale every year and about 100 inches fall on this beach. 5 of the 7 famous waterfalls can be seen here.

Despite all that rain, days are mostly clear so it still took me several return trips to this beach in order to be here at the right time. Up to seven waterfalls are often seen in the mountains after a good rain shower. The atmosphere created some nice warm filtered light, which turned the sand into gold for a few seconds in between waves. The sun is rising to the left of the frame.

0.3-second exposure @F18

with Lee soft ND grad 0.9 + 0.6 with Lee filter holder

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @ 30

ISO 50

Small Slik Mini tripod

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Waianapanapa Sands - Pa'iloa Beach, near Hana, Maui

Waianapanapa Sands, Waianapanapa State Park, East Maui

Waianapanapa (why-ah- nahpa-nahpa) means, ‘glistening waters’ and they aren’t kidding!

There are many ways to photograph this black sand beach near Hana, Maui. But it takes a while to see the opportunities. In this moment, the sand was briefly wet and reflected the last glowing light from the clouds above. It took a while for a wave to break just when the sand was glowing. I tried for 5 minutes before the timing was right. A few minutes later the light was gone for the day. The sun set behind the camera.

It took a good deal of work to capture all the elements I wanted, but still I was lucky!

0.5 second exposure @F16

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @ 18

Lee 150x100mm soft ND grads 0.9 + 0.6

Lee filter holder

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Sandstone and Sky #1 - La Jolla, California

Sandstone and Sky #1, La Jolla, California

I was shooting the sunrise out at the point on the far left of this frame, pointing to the right over the ocean towards the sunrise when I looked up and saw this amazing formation in the strato-cumulus cloud deck. I looked around for some rock formations that lined up with the clouds but saw nothing out there. So, I ran almost a mile down the beach over terrain like you see in the foreground until I finally saw what I wanted.

Fortunately the cloud formation stayed in place long enough for me to capture it here! Then I waited for a wave to complement the scene and foam to provide definition to the sandstone formation on the right side of the frame. I have never seen anything like this before or after, so I was quite fortunate!

1/6-second @F22 with LEE soft ND grad 0.75

Lee filter holder

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @ 17

ISO 100

Small Slik mini tripod

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

Portal of the Sun - Pfeiffer Beach, California

Portal of the Sun, Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur, California

This is the second view in this book of the sea arch opening in a cliff face at Pfeiffer Beach in Big Sur. The opening allows large waves to come through at high tide before a big storm. The waves often fill the entire portal to the top, and the portal becomes a giant water shotgun! The Tafoni formations in the rock are incredible and should be seen in person. The sun was only like this for about 30 seconds so I had to work fast. Fortunately, the sunlight was dimmed by high clouds and low fog but there was still enough light to reflect onto the rock face from the cliff behind the camera. Usually, it’s not possible to get this shot because the sun is WAY too bright.

Back lighting off the cliff face behind the camera is crucial here. Otherwise you have an overexposed portal with no detail on the rock face. Once the light was right, I waited for the water flow to become dramatic. A short exposure time allowed a little movement while retaining detail of the sea spray.

Canon 5D

Canon 24-105L @ 105

1/6-second exposure @F8

LEE soft ND grad 0.9 inverted so that the dark part is over the water.

ISO 50

Small Slik Mini tripod

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

 

Exposed - Isla Mujeres, near Cancun, Mexico

Exposed, Isla Mujeres Mexico (Near Cancun)

A week before I made this image, I noticed how the sun was moving over each day until it would set right behind this old eroded pier as the summer solstice approached. I took a few shots with the sun slightly off center in case the weather did not cooperate. So I knew to return to make a long exposure at sunset a week later. It’s good to arrive at a location with an open mind because you never know what to expect. Set aside your expectations and observe what elements attract the eye. In the RAW file, this image had an overwhelming amount of color, so I had to de-saturate the sky in order to get back the details, which had become lost in blobs of bright orange.

In October of 2005, Hurricane Wilma scored a direct hit on this island with category 5 winds gusting over 200 miles per hour. Many beaches were stripped of their sand, revealing old features not seen in many years, like this old pier on the north side of the island. I was told that before the hurricane, these pilings were under many feet of sand and that the beach used to extend well past the last post seen here.

In landscape photography it pays to know how the natural world works, just as a bird photographer must know the habits of the birds to get the best shots. On the last day of my trip, the sun set right at the end of the pier. I was ready and had an image in my head of what I hoped I could capture. Fortunately the sun dropped below the clouds at the last minute and became visible right as the sun set. I had taken photographs on the previous evenings just in case this evening turned out to be cloudy just to be on the safe side. Some guys walked behind me as I photographed this moment and said, “Wow, what a lucky shot!”

I was lucky to be on vacation during this time, but the rest was planning!

 

30-second exposure @F22

LEE soft ND grad 0.9 angled 9:30am-3:30pm

I used Lee 150x100mm soft ND grads with a Lee holder.

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

 

Portal to Big Sur - Natural Bridges State Park, Santa Cruz, Cali

Portal to Big Sur, Natural Bridges State Park, Santa Cruz,CA.

Natural Bridges State Park in Santa Cruz is a great place to watch the sunset. This is one of the few remaining arches, as the other ones have been washed into the sea. New ones will replace them as the years go by. The tip of the Monterey Peninsula and the start of the Big Sur coast 40 miles away are shown in the middle of the arch.

In order to show this arch in the best light, I had to wait until November for the setting sun to be at the best angle to show the detail on the arch face. I also wanted some cloud cover, which becomes more common as the 7 month summer dry season comes to a close at this time of year. I used a long exposure to smooth the water, highlighting the arch and distant coastline. I timed it for when the sand was at its most reflective state at low tide with the slow movement of the water painting lines in the sand.

There was an awesome sunset to the right of the frame, but I resisted the urge to point at the sun because the light was better on the seascape in this direction.

12-second exposure @F8

LEE soft ND Grad 0.9 (Angled at 10am-4pm)

Canon 5D

Canon 17-40L @34

ISO 50

Small Slik Mini tripod

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

 

 

 

Passageway - Golden Gate Bridge, California

The Passageway, Golden Gate Bridge, Sausalito, California

Fog never fails to create lots of atmosphere and mood. The Golden Gate is both a passageway for people as well as for lots of ocean fog to cool off the hot inland areas. It can be 60 degrees F (15C) here and 104F (40C) a few miles inland. A long exposure shows the way the fog flowed through the gate. The last light of the sun and the lights of the bridge in equal amounts illuminated the fog. This light lasts for only a few minutes, so in the course of one evening, only one or two chances for a long exposure such as this are possible.

Since there is no time to take light readings, a good guess for the camera settings based on experience is the best way to go or you will miss the shot. Even though it was getting dark, the sky was still much brighter than the sea, so I used an ND grad filter to even out that contrast. It worked just the same as during the day.

It took me three years to capture this moment and I have never seen it happen again. Nobody was down here. There were dozens of tripods set up on the well-worn hillside to the right of the frame, but they were pointing in the wrong direction to see this reflected light on the water and how it moved through the fog and clouds.

Canon 5D (mark I)

Canon 17-40L @ 40

2-minute exposure @F16

Two minutes is a good place to start if you must guess.

LEE ND soft grad 0.9 angled 10am-4pm

Lee filter holder

ISO 50

RAW file processed with Capture One by Phase One

TIFF file processed with Photoshop

Keen water shoes

 

End of: 40 photos Described

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